4 Way To Save Money As A Full Time Mom Or Dad

4 Way To Save Money As A Full Time Mom Or Dad

Being a parent is one of the hardest jobs out there, but for all the hard work, it doesn’t exactly bring in the cash. Being a stay-at-home parent doesn’t mean that you have to let financial stresses get to you, though. Whether you’re a full time mom, dad, or any other type of guardian, there are easy ways you can build a bit of savings without having to take time or attention away from your kids or other priorities.

Sell Some Stuff

Here’s the beauty of a garage sale – it lets you clean out your home of all the stuff you’ve accumulated and nets you some cash on the side. If you’re a full-time parent, though, the thought of getting up even earlier than you already do and doing a lot of heavy lifting at the crack of dawn only to go back in and do it all again for the kids probably isn’t an appealing idea. So instead, take the garage sale concept and move it online.

Selling your old stuff through online marketplaces like eBay and Craigslist are great ways to make some cash while decluttering, with the added benefit of being able to sleep in. It’s not just about big ticket items. Parents are always looking for affordable deals for school books, clothing and toys kids will grow out of quickly. If you’ve got clothes that don’t fit your kid anymore, you’ve got a tiny gold mine.

Rent Out Extra Space

You might not have extra space in the house, but did you know you can rent out your garage, driveway, or even parcels of your backyard? If you live in a city or near a transportation or office hub, places to park are at a premium. Renting out your garage or driveway is a great way to earn regular cash with little effort.

Renting a small parcel of land for something like gardening is also an option – just be sure to have very clear terms about what can and cannot be done on your land, and have it all in writing. This can help you prevent the planting of anything detrimental to your family and pets, or otherwise against the law.

Take An At Home Job

If you have a bit more time when the kids are in school, an at-home part-time job might be the way to go. You won’t be giving up any time with your family, and you’ll still be right there when you need them, but working as a virtual assistant, content writer, tutor, designer, or whatever else your interest might be comes with the benefit of being able to challenge yourself and do something that you enjoy while still being available as a parent. Be sure to do a bit of research to make sure the person or company for whom you work is on the up and up, but if you find a position you like, there’s no reason you can’t have a career at home.

Do Some Daycare

If you’ve got a kid, odds are they have friends. At least some of those friends probably need watching at least some of the time. Doing a bit of daycare lets you make cash just by watching other kids along with your own. You’re essentially making money for doing what you do every day, but on a larger scale. You can do it as much or as little as you desire, and of course you can pick your own clients. It’s the easiest way to parlay your skills as a parent into cash.

What a mom shouldn’t miss to give healthy meals on a budget

What a mom shouldn’t miss to give healthy meals on a budget

Sticking to the budget and giving healthy foods to the little one at the same time are challenging. Toddlers are very fussy with their food habits. Most of the times, they waste the whole meal and demand snacks just a little later to fulfill their hunger. This made a mom little confuse while budgeting is an another issue to take into the account. Don’t worry! There are many ways to save on your food bill while giving nutritious foods to your growing toddler.

1. Shop wisely and healthy

If you want your toddler to eat healthy, then you must shop healthy items. Remember, buying healthy doesn’t have to bust your budget. It just needs your little bit concentration while shopping. With a little planning, you can buy healthy items to serve healthy meals! Here you go!

  • There are many other places to buy food instead of the conventional grocery store. Search and visit to the stores in your area for comparison shopping. This way you’ll save a lot of money.
  • Consider discount store like Costco, Sam’s to get a bargain price. Get seasonal products with lower price there.
  • You must buy a smaller size and plan carefully to balance both nutrition and food waste. This will help you to manage the portion size as well.

2. Consider Farmer’s Markets to get fresh veggies at a lower price

Sometimes local farmers bring their items to sell. You can get fresh vegetable directly from them. However, generic brands are good as well. So, you can consider generic brands instead of those brand names.

3. Guide your toddler to eat healthily

You have to serve healthy, balanced diet for toddlers so that they meet all the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. But, don’t shout or make noise if they seem to be picky with their foods. Picky eating is quite a normal thing in toddlers. Just build some positive eating habits that will work in the long run.

4. Follow an ideal meal plan

A toddler needs to be meet proper nutrients at this stage. They seem to be busy all the day so you must provide proper meal to your toddler. Try to offer three meals and two to three small snacks to your toddler. Remember, snacks play a vital role to fulfill the hunger of a toddler. They usually feel less interest to eat the big meal. They love to eat yummy snacks that fits with their small time and take the little time to finish. Proper snack will produce energy to keep your toddler busy all day long. Offer water to your toddler in between meals and snacks. You can even offer milk and juice that don’t contain sugar. Remember, too much juice can spoil your child’s teeth. Serve small portions each time and let your child finish it first and then repeat if required.

5. Don’t buy processed items for your toddler

If you really want your toddler to eat healthy things, then say “NO” to the processed items. Snacks attract toddlers, but you shouldn’t offer processed items as they contain harmful ingredients and artificial colors. Give fresh fruits, fruit, yogurt smoothie and thinly sliced vegetable sticks instead of giving processed snacks to your toddler.

6. Follow some tricks

  • Use some tricks to make simple food into an interesting one. For instance:
  • Add more colorful veggies and fruits to the meals and snacks eg, small pieces of strawberries in yogurt, corn, green herbs, carrots as and when required to make the dishes more colorful.
  • Go for grilled instead of frying.
  • Serve corn bread, crackers, whole wheat tortillas.
  • Consider some DIY food arts to attract your toddler.

7. Consider homemade food as much as possible

Less eating out allows to provide healthier options for your toddler. How? Having homemade food saves a lot of money, which give more chance to pick healthier foods for your child. There are many easy and simple recipes available. Search on the Internet and pick the best one that goes perfectly for your kids as well as for the whole family

8. Make mealtime peaceful


Toddlers are fussy eaters and they have constantly refused food at this time. If you face the same scenario, then don’t make the situation worse by making noise. You must take it normal and make a calm environment when your toddler is eating. Thus, you’ll be able to build a positive eating experience in your toddler that helps to reduce food waste in the long run.

9. Low-cost snacks and drink ideas

  • Some easy to made and low-cost snacks and drink ideas as follows:
  • Figs, raisins are a good snack for your older sweet-toothed toddler.
  • For a younger toddler, use raw and well-boiled vegetables and finger foods such as boiled and slickly cut carrot, beans, and so on.
  • Offer cracker with cheese at the snack time.
  • Homemade soup, cheese and fruit sticks are also good options.

Final thoughts

Feeding healthy to the toddler doesn’t have to cost most. Smart shopping for veggies, fruits, meats, proper meal planning can do the magic. If you experience frequent power struggle time while feeding your toddler and your kid sleeps less than usual, then seek pediatric consult for help.

Baby Items You Don’t Need

There’s no question about it: Babies are expensive. From nursery furniture to car seats to clothing, the cost of raising an infant can really add up. And let’s not forget the monthly expense of diapers, wipes, and food. While there’s no getting around certain baby-related expenses, you can cut corners and save money by being smart about the things you buy. In fact, there are plenty of popular baby items out there that you can easily do without. If you’re on a budget, here a few you’ll probably want to skip:

Wipe Warmer

It’s natural to want your baby to be as comfortable as possible, but here’s the thing: Wipes were designed to keep babies nice and clean, and they do their job just fine at whatever natural temperature they come in. Unless you’re storing your wipes in the refrigerator (and why would you?), there’s no need to warm them up before applying them to your baby’s bottom. Save your $30, or, if anything, spend it on a nice warm blanket.

Baby Bullet

There’s no need to spend $60 or more on a food processor with cute packaging. Want to know what does a fine job at pureeing baby food? A regular food processor. If you have one already, there’s no need to spend money on the baby version.

Plush Stuffed Animals

Sure, stuffed animals are nice and soft, and they’re perhaps fun to look at, but there’s no need to buy your infant an expensive one. In fact, many stuffed animals are actually unsafe for babies, as they come with removable eyes and other hazardous components for infants. Instead of stuffed animals, invest in some learning and development toys for your little one.

Shopping Cart Covers

Germs are a part of life, and while it’s natural to want to keep your baby in a virtual bubble, one day you’ll realize that you can only do so much to prevent your child from catching whatever’s going around. Until then, do yourself a favor and save your $30 or $40 by taking that shopping cart cover off your list. Not only does it only serve a limited purpose (your child can still reach out and touch other parts of the cart), but it’s also going to add to your already out-of-control laundry pile.

Crib Bumpers

Crib bumpers are cute and all, but these days, doctors actually advise against using them. The logic is that young babies can roll over and get caught in them, thus creating a hazardous sleeping environment. There’s no sense in spending extra money on something that’s not even safe for your baby.

Sheet Savers

Sheet savers are only effective if your infant stays absolutely still during the night. Once your baby starts squirming around in his or her crib, those sheet savers are rendered completely useless. You’re better off spending money on an extra set of sheets.

Remember, the people who market these baby products are very good at what they do. Give them a chance, and they’ll have you convinced that you absolutely need these products to give your baby the best start at life. In reality, there are plenty of so-called baby essentials you can skip, and your infant isn’t going to suffer one bit in the process. Stick to the basics, and use whatever leftover money you have to make your life easier. Or put it toward your baby’s college fund. Just don’t waste it on useless gear you’ll only regret buying.

5 Things You Really Need When Having Your First Baby

Seeing the results of a pregnancy test can leave you feeling shocked, overwhelmed, excited, and anxious. But those feelings pale in comparison to how you’ll feel after taking your first trip down to your nearest “baby” store.

After losing yourself (and possibly your mind) for hours and hours in aisles filled from top to bottom with all things baby related, it’s likely you might leave the store questioning if you’re fit to be a parent. After all, don’t good parents buy things like wipe warmers and ergonomically designed pacifiers for their babies? And if you don’t or can’t, what does that make you?

A complete and utter parental failure. The baby hasn’t even arrived yet and you’re already letting it down. Way to go mom and dad.

The truth is most of the thousands upon thousands of items in those baby stores are not necessary for raising a thriving, healthy baby. Sure, there are lots of products that will help you in your quest to become the parent you’ve always wanted to be, but in general, there are just a handful of “must-haves” when it comes to taking your first baby home.

#1-A Good Crib Mattress

You don’t need the latest, greatest, state-of-the-art crib, but the crib mattress?  Well, that’s another thing altogether. Pinching pennies on a crib mattress may very well result in a saggy, unsupportive mattress in just a few months’ time and you’ll find yourself once again spending cash on another mattress. Save yourself the second trip and just get a better quality mattress to start with. You’ll sleep better and hopefully, so will your baby.

#2- A Video Monitor

The first few months of parenthood?  You might find yourself going a little insane.  You’re tired and constantly worried about this tiny little person you’ve just brought in to the world.  You might be so anxious about SIDS that you actually find yourself sleeping on the floor next to your baby’s crib as if you’d be able to fend it off.  Some parents get a monitor that lets them hear their baby’s cries and later, baby’s babbles.  I’d suggest taking it a step further and getting a video monitor so you can actually see what’s going on.  I can’t tell you how many times I heard a few sounds, ran into my son’s room to see what was wrong, only to find out he was  making sounds in his sleep and my running into his room in panic mode only resulted in waking him.  A video monitor lets you see and hear your sleeping angel—giving you much needed reassurance.

#3-A Sling

It’s no secret that babies like to be held.  Some of them will make you hold them forever.  And if you’re lucky enough to get one of those babies, it’s highly unlikely you’re going to have dinner/a clean house/a chance to do laundry for a few months.  Get a swaddle, wrap, or sling, bundle your little guy or gal up in it and enjoy hands’-free parenting at its finest.

#4- A Quality Stroller

Your baby will spend quite a bit of time in his or her stroller in the first year or two of life, but make sure it’s one you really like too. There are so many options out there, it really just depends on your lifestyle and what you plan on using the stroller for.  My go-to was the City Mini.  Everything about this bad boy was easy—and it made traveling a snap with its quick release fold handle.  My favorite trick was when we’d be in the security line at the airport.  No one likes to get behind a family with a kid and stroller, right?  Well, they’d be shocked when I’d just yank the handle up on the stroller and the whole thing just collapsed like a house of cards.  Mic drop.

#5-Earplugs

For you, not for baby.  Sure, it’s kind of a joke, but also kind of not.  Shrill baby cries got you down?  Earplugs.  Is it your shift to sleep, but every whimper or sniffle wakes you up?  Earplugs.  Has your spouse’s voice inexplicably become extra annoying (this will return to normal in a  few months.  Maybe.) Earplugs.  Take the edge off and be that super-parent you’ve always dreamed of becoming.

Don’t buy into the hype.  Babies are simple little creatures that don’t need much—it’s us parents that over-complicate the situation by thinking we need it all in order to be a gold star parent.

How To Teach Kids the Basics of Budgeting and Spending Responsibly

Budgeting and spending responsibly aren’t skills that should be developed later in life. Money knowledge is on the same plane as reading and being polite. By instilling positive, responsible spending habits, you’ll set up your kid (or kids) for success.

Set an Example

There’s no doubt about the fact that kids are great observers and absorb what’s going on around them. So, be cognizant about how you talk about money and how you actually spend money. When it comes down to it, practice what you preach.

An Allowance

In the world of parenting, allowances are extremely common. However, they are about more than just simple cash every week. Make an allowance something that is earned from doing chores/homework, not something that is a given. If they aren’t good or tasks aren’t completed, don’t give an allowance. This shows kids the connection between doing work and receiving money.

Additionally, you can also use allowance money and birthday/holiday gifts to form a mini bank. Let them know how much money they have. You could keep the information in a notebook or maybe display it on the fridge, so it’s visible.

When they want to buy something, like a toy, have them look at the cost of it. Then, have them compare the cost to the amount of money they have. In order to help them make educated choices, help them set goals. Good questions to ask include:

  • What do you really, really want? Based on its cost, how many weeks would you need to save to get it?
  • Is there anything you can do to get to your goal quicker, like a lemonade stand or additional chores?

It can be helpful to keep the money that accumulates in two jars: spend and save. Instead of the traditional opaque piggy bank, try something see-through, so kids can visually see money adding up.

Apps/Games

For young kids, it may be difficult to tell the difference between game currency and actual in-app purchases. A good amount of parents have been surprised when they’ve been charged for in-app purchases when their kids use their tablets.

A great lesson revolves around the difference between play money in games and actual currency. Oh, and it doesn’t hurt to block in-app purchases, either.

Real Budgets

As kids get older, they can handle more complex information about money and finances. Of course, you probably don’t want your kids to know the ins and outs of your personal budget, but what can you share? Think it over by yourself or with your spouse, and share what you feel comfortable with.

Explain your thought process and let your kids know when you’ve run into challenges. That way, they’ll be able to see that budgeting isn’t a black and white process, and it can be difficult sometimes – beyond just buying a recreational item.

At the end of the day, whether you’re a mom or a kid, budgeting is difficult. There is always more to learn (after all, that’s probably why you’re reading this blog!). Emphasize this to your little ones as they grow up into young adults, and you’ll be sure to see them flourish financially.

Save Money on Groceries: Simple Ways to Slash Your Grocery Bills

It takes money to keep a family well-fed. The average American spends $150 a week on groceries, and if your diet is rich in fruits and vegetables (as it should be), you’re probably spending more. If the cost of food is wreaking havoc on your on budget, here are some ways you can save money on groceries without compromising on the quality of the meals you’re serving up:

Plan Ahead

Some people get to the store, see what’s on sale, and make purchases based on what they think they need for the week. By doing this, you’re more likely to waste both money and time. Instead, plan out your meals before shopping and make a list of the ingredients you’re missing. This will enable you to stay focused when you hit the supermarket and help you avoid having to go back later in the week.

Track Your Inventory

A lot of people waste money on groceries by buying things they don’t actually need. One way to combat this is to keep an inventory spreadsheet of the things you have in your pantry and fridge. Print out an alphabetized, easy-to-scan copy before heading to the store, or make sure it’s accessible on your mobile phone. This way, you can compare what’s on sale to the things you already have stocked and avoid spending money on unnecessary supplies.

Get a Store Card

It’s usually not a good idea to open too many credit cards at once, but store cards aren’t like that. It makes sense to get a store card for every supermarket you shop at, including the ones you visit infrequently. Often, you need a store card to take advantage of sales and promotions. Some supermarkets, for example, offer holiday bonuses, like free turkeys around Thanksgiving time, for spending a certain amount of money the month before—a perk only available to cardholders.

Check for Digital Coupons

You may be used to checking the circulars that come in the mail for weekly sales and specials, but how often do you go online to look for deals? Many supermarkets offer additional savings via digital coupons, which you can find online and load to your store card. Remember, you won’t save money on groceries with coupons if you buy stuff you wouldn’t ordinarily buy just because you have a coupon.

Buy in Bulk, But Only When it Makes Sense

Buying in bulk can save you money if you do it wisely. If there are certain staple items that you use frequently, by all means, stock up if the price is right. But if the on-sale bulk item in question is not a popular one in your household, you’re probably better off passing up the so-called deal. Remember, even canned goods and pantry staples have expiration dates, and if you wind up throwing out food, you’ll have wasted money for no good reason. If the bulk price is truly unbeatable but you’re not sure you’ll use up your purchase before it goes bad, try finding friends, family members, or neighbors who might be willing to split the goods—and the cost.

Embrace the Season

Seasonal items tend to go on sale to coincide with consumer demand. Barbecue staples and condiments, for example, are usually available at a discount before holiday weekends, and baking supplies are often reduced in the weeks leading up to the holidays. If you start running low on non-essentials, before you restock, think about whether waiting a few weeks will bring you closer to a lower price.

Never Shop Hungry

It’s a tried and true piece of advice: The hungrier you are when you hit the supermarket, the more likely you are to make impulse purchases. Do your shopping after a meal, or grab a quick, energizing snack before you go. Otherwise you could wind up buying things that are not only bad for you, but bad for your wallet.